Reducing Storm Damage from Trees

Written By Arman Zulhajar on Wednesday, May 23, 2012 | 1:44 AM

By Tina Gleisner


Trees are one of the most popular landscaping features, and some homeowners won't even consider buying a home without mature trees. Many homeowners think that if trees have been there for 20 or more years, nothing will happen, but with the varied and unusual weather patterns we've had the last few years, almost anything kind of tree damage is possible. The question is how do we minimize the damage these trees can do to our homes and cars?

Tips to reduce your risk of tree damage

Planning and Planting Your Trees

You may want to consider where you plant young trees and which trees you remove when it's time to thin out your backyard forest.

* Don't plant trees to close to any buildings or wires. Planting to close may cause damage if the tree or a branch falls.

* Trees need a healthy root system, so avoid planting on steep banks or shallow/wet soils.

* Don't plant trees to close to any buildings or wires. Planting to close may cause damage if the tree or a branch falls.

* If your home gets ice and snow, avoid trees that hold their leaves late in the year as they're more vulnerable to ice and the weight can easily snap tree branches.

Planning and Planting Your Trees

You may want to consider where you plant young trees and which trees you remove when it's time to thin out your backyard forest.

* Keep your trees and shrubs healthy by watering, fertilizing and mulching to protect the soil.

* Include annual pruning in your yard maintenance plan, getting rid of dead or weak branches before they break.

* Some tree species are brittle like elm, willow, poplar, etc. Don't plant brittle trees in locations exposed to extreme weather.

* If your home gets ice and snow, avoid trees that hold their leaves late in the year as they're more vulnerable to ice and the weight can easily snap tree branches.

Tree Care After a Storm

Inevitably one or more trees in your yard will suffer storm damage so it is important to treat the tree(s) to give them the best chance at recovering properly. First, you need to prune injured branches to minimize how much woody tissue is exposed to the air. According to Montana State University Extension Services article, After the Storm: Caring for Your Trees, "Open wood is an invitation to pests and pathogens to enter the tree and cause further damage. Injuries caused by twisted and broken branches need to be trimmed in such a way that the tree is able to heal over the wound as quickly as possible."




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